"Passing on our passions is difficult.  We have an instruction system called school.   We have a personal system called mentoring.  We even have a memorization system called indoctrination. 
These are all good options to pass on what an individual feels is important.

Religion is one of the best examples I can think of.  

A first generation person encounters God.  They persist in knowing God.  Unfailingly they will talk to God, seek out more information about God, find others who know God.

The second generation sees the benefits but often lives shadow lives.  They talk to God in emergencies, seek out God when there is a benefit for them, and don’t see the need to find others who are passionate about God.

The third generation has been inoculated.  The passion for God has not been a visible, constant concern to them.  They don’t see a need to talk to God (in fact, they often call themselves atheists), they don’t need information about God (as an atheist, information about God is irrelevant), and they don’t want to be offended by being with people who persist in knowing God.

For a first generation person, wanting the generations that follow to catch the passion, we must teach and model our passion.  But we must also call the next generation to own the passion.  Not just to adopt the system and science of your passion, but to embrace the heart and the art of the passion."